Depth of Longing
This image is taken from a sculptural artist book I am currently working on.  To see it in its final state, check my blog next week:  LindseyDunnagan.blogspot.com

Depth of Longing

This image is taken from a sculptural artist book I am currently working on.  To see it in its final state, check my blog next week:  LindseyDunnagan.blogspot.com

 
Now is the time to be a dc member! Get VIP access to #DDMarket + entry into 3 exhibition openings a year! Visit DallasContemporary.org/membership.html to see our membership levels.  (at Dallas Contemporary)

Now is the time to be a dc member! Get VIP access to #DDMarket + entry into 3 exhibition openings a year! Visit DallasContemporary.org/membership.html to see our membership levels. (at Dallas Contemporary)

 
Spend some quiet time in our cool galleries, reflecting on Julian Schnabel’s 13 monumental works! Exhibition closes SUNDAY 10 AUG. #free  (at Dallas Contemporary)

Spend some quiet time in our cool galleries, reflecting on Julian Schnabel’s 13 monumental works! Exhibition closes SUNDAY 10 AUG. #free (at Dallas Contemporary)

 
It’s the Design District Gallery Day and we challenge you to spend the day in our neighborhood! Complete these challenges and you could win a dc membership, VIP access to DDM@DC or a tote! Hashtag #dcGalleryGames + let the games begin!!  (at Dallas Contemporary)

It’s the Design District Gallery Day and we challenge you to spend the day in our neighborhood! Complete these challenges and you could win a dc membership, VIP access to DDM@DC or a tote! Hashtag #dcGalleryGames + let the games begin!! (at Dallas Contemporary)

 
This current series, “Planned Obsolescence," is me exploring the themes of production, consumption, transience, the temporal vs. the permanent (and where the two intersect), waste, utility, prediction of the future, legacy and prophesy. In many ways it is my attempt to make the impermanent permanent. I am trying to explore the echoes of things lost as well as make imperfect fulfillments of those echos.

I’ve chosen cement as my material. It is solid, stone, permanent, yet it was once malleable and fluid. Its strength is designed for permanent structure, but I’ve placed it in transient, discarded molds. 

To further capture the essence of the thing in these “portraits of transience,” I have placed objects which rot, lessen,and fade within the cement. For these objects, the impermanence must both be the mold, and inside the strength of the cement.

These rotting objects both question the integrity of the cement, and further pronounce the duality of the thing I’m after here. The absence reveals both the presence and the echo.

When I was becoming an adult, I remember the feeling of immense shame when I learned that Chevrolet, a company my father and grandfather had worked for for their whole lives, had designed products that would fail in a few years time to require either continued maintenance, or often complete replacement. I remember confronting my father about this. I will never forget the pain on his face.

This series for me speaks to an impulse of production and mass consumption I used to think was inherently American, but I now see it as near ubiquitous.

But this is not just a social commentary series.

This is a series about loss for me. The objects speak to coming to terms with loss. About coming to terms with time and its magnitude. An attempt to capture things, ideas, feelings we knew wouldn’t last. And sometimes things we thought would last but failed regardless.

This current series, “Planned Obsolescence," is me exploring the themes of production, consumption, transience, the temporal vs. the permanent (and where the two intersect), waste, utility, prediction of the future, legacy and prophesy. In many ways it is my attempt to make the impermanent permanent. I am trying to explore the echoes of things lost as well as make imperfect fulfillments of those echos.

I’ve chosen cement as my material. It is solid, stone, permanent, yet it was once malleable and fluid. Its strength is designed for permanent structure, but I’ve placed it in transient, discarded molds. 
To further capture the essence of the thing in these “portraits of transience,” I have placed objects which rot, lessen,and fade within the cement. For these objects, the impermanence must both be the mold, and inside the strength of the cement.
These rotting objects both question the integrity of the cement, and further pronounce the duality of the thing I’m after here. The absence reveals both the presence and the echo.
When I was becoming an adult, I remember the feeling of immense shame when I learned that Chevrolet, a company my father and grandfather had worked for for their whole lives, had designed products that would fail in a few years time to require either continued maintenance, or often complete replacement. I remember confronting my father about this. I will never forget the pain on his face.
This series for me speaks to an impulse of production and mass consumption I used to think was inherently American, but I now see it as near ubiquitous.
But this is not just a social commentary series.
This is a series about loss for me. The objects speak to coming to terms with loss. About coming to terms with time and its magnitude. An attempt to capture things, ideas, feelings we knew wouldn’t last. And sometimes things we thought would last but failed regardless.
 
The kids of Frets Park Recreation stopped by #dc today to make neurons in the @paulacrown_art installation and had a blast!  (at Dallas Contemporary)

The kids of Frets Park Recreation stopped by #dc today to make neurons in the @paulacrown_art installation and had a blast! (at Dallas Contemporary)